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Three local teens teamed up and won an international entrepreneurship competition and they’re celebrating their contributions to improving the workforce community.

San Diego County resident Kathryn Muñoz has had her hands in a lot of service organizations: the women’s philanthropy group Las Patronas, and the mother-daughter philanthropy group National Charity League, to name a few. She is continuing her community service in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic by supporting area restaurants and frontline workers through a program called Feed the Fight SD, through which she raises funds to purchase meals from local eateries and deliver them to local medical facilities.

Amid the novel coronavirus outbreak, Chimney Sweeps, Inc., is still providing inspections, repairs and other services to its customers throughout the San Diego County region.

La Jolla resident Scott Flavell was grappling with his own coronavirus-caused problem: laying off workers in his Kearny Mesa factory. It manufactured postural correction products for the chiropractic industry — not exactly an essential business. As Flavell left a local market and seeing grocery employees working closely with others, a simultaneous solution to both problems suddenly dawned on him. His factory would switch to manufacturing face masks and donate them to grocery stores. He shifted production and made 10,000 masks at an initial cost of $3,000, but offering them for free.

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La Jolla Historical Society’s next exhibition, “Tijuana 1964: The Photography of Harry Crosby,” opens Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020 with more than 60 black-and-white photographs. The La Jolla Historical Society presenting an exhibition on Tijuana? Yes indeed, Historical Society executive director Heath Fox says: “There is a stereotype of what a ‘historical society’ is, focused on reporting the past of a defined geographic area ... but a 21st century museum cannot be so static. It must be dynamic, presenting programs that are fresh, thought-provoking and forward-thinking. We don’t think of La Jolla as a cultural island. We consider it in context to the City of San Diego and part of the Southern California/Northern Mexico megalopolis.”

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